Jesus 'n Jim

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different ways to get on the internet - ISP's

 

whitefence.com - a discount broker of utilities for new houses (or existing houses) somebody toldmeabout this. not a complete selection of ISPs. pound the pavement and the phone book if you want high data rates and low price.

Remember that TCP/IP works in such a way that the lowest of (upload rate,download rate) becomes your data rate.

Overview

This page shows you how to get connected to the internet: companies, ISP's, methods.
All ISP's require a credit card or debit card for billing purposes.

As with any ISP, not available in all areas, due to laws I think.

Don't go for 1Mbps if you need streamed video. get at least 7Mbps for download rate. this is what support told us we needed for internet streamed video (church services, youtube, Godtube, vimeo, webinars, maybe online classes, etc).

Need filtered internet service (child-safe, business-safe)? see this list of ISP's.

Routers: With routers, you will generally need to do a 10 second reset on the router (or whatever procedure they recommend) before you hook up the router to your modem. before you hook the router up to your modem, you will need to set up the connection and software using your modem and computer first. then you can move the ethernet cable from the computer to the internet jack on the router, and plug an extra ethernet cable between one of the numbered ports of the back of the router and your computer. but don't rely on this: check your manuals and/or call up a tech at the router company, because it may be different! With Linksys routers, they will basically have you hook your modem up to your computer, reset the router for 10 seconds (depending on your model), and go to
http://192.168.0.1 or
http://192.168.1.1 or
http://192.168.2.1 (router's internal configuration web server, the address depnds on the manufacturer) and configure your router, no need to use the cdrom unless you need to connect your phones using apps or something (I don't need an app for my phone). If you are going wireless you will have more success with 802.11ac (wireless ac) routers.

In South Korea, 100Mbps is ordinary. in Japan 1Gbps is ordinary. Far cry from other parts of the world. So, why are we, in the USA, behind? Marketing & business strategies, most likely. We already have VDSL modems that can do 100Mbps at Verizon's specified 600'(2006,2008). Just waiting for companies to introduce faster rates. Cable was supposed to introduce 100Mbps in 2008, but I am sure it hasn't caught on because of the $179/mo rate. Japan is selling 100Mbps/50Mbps. 300Mbps modems are available I think.


Note to Business users:

A T1 line is quite expensive I am told. Cable is probably less expensive and easier to maintain. there is special equipment and a T1 line to buy (1.544Mbps both ways, which crawls, but it is solid, and not shared and doesn't vary). The experience of someone buying Frame Relay (56kbps) from the phone company was that and once you buy it, the equipment and line is yours (including if someone cuts it). so he had wires laying all over the ground from point a to point b. you might want to ask the phone company some questions before getting this.

Don't go for 1Mbps if you need streamed video. get at least 7Mbps download rate for download rate. this is what support told us we needed for internet streamed video (youtube, vimeo, etc).

There are other ways to get high speed internet, but they can be somewhat expensive:

  • fiber to the house (includes Verizon/Frontier FiOS 25Mbps/25Mbps and 35Mbps/35Mbps, centurylink 40Mbps/5Mbps (subject to availability). affected by distance to Central Office. if your city mayor offers MetroFi (metropolitan fiber to the house), go for it. yu will get VERY high speeds, to the whole city, with possibly lower infrastructure costs.
  • Cable and FiOS can be fast some or most of the time, but doesn't usually reach anywhere near its peak speed. sometimes it gets to about dialup speed. the reason why is it's a shared connection. the more people are on it, the slower it goes.
  • Microwave backhaul is about 10Mbps-1Gbps, directional, line-of-sight, I think affected by weather like rain & snow, requires a tower, gets rave reviews from a farmer I know in Montana.
  • Satellite is out (too slow due to miles earth-to-satellite latency/delay). directional. 10Mbps max and very expensive, big delays. affected by rain and snow and planes interrupting service line-of-sight.
  • WiMAX, sold by Clear.com is directional, slow and flaky (0-6Mbps max, and you have to be good at aiming your modem, best to have the technician install the thing). affected by weather and who knows what. some weather I think, like snow takes it down. best to be close to the tower.
  • Wireless Dish goes slow and is expensive.
  • DSL is always 896Kbps upload speed, with 12Mbps, 7Mbps upload speed. used to be unshared, but now the ISP's have made it a shared connection, so you don't always get the speed it's rated at. affected by distance to Central Office.

nothing's perfect down here, only a DS3 at 45Mbps (or above) or Sonnet at 655Mbps or Microwave backhaul at around 45Mbps really scream. There is a 1.3Gbps wireless service as of 2012/2013 if I remember right.

For a firewall (router replacement for more security), I would recommend to you a SonicWall firewall appliance. I have not installed one of these. they are about $295+ and include non-defragmenting deep packet inspection, and antivirus, VPN, intrusion prevention, antivirus, anti-spyware (which probably means you pay monthly for a service of some sort), and wireless LAN, multi-WAN failover, content filtering. There is ONE firewall which doesn't require a monthly fee, if all you need is basic port blocking or something simple. But it requires some understanding about networking. price goes up REALLY FAST, so be prepared for a starter price of $1000-$1500. the devices don't have a very high data rate, because the existing firewall chips don't go much beyond 25Mbps right now - with comcast doubling their speed, this should change quickly I hope. pray for faster speeds? they do charge $10/mo for the "free" speed upgrade.


Email without computer (3 dialup services, 1 voice service)

  • Landel Mailbug, available from landel $125+$9.95/mo. It's a little keyboard and LCD display, and like most of these, probably plugs into your phone line. Order by fax or online. prints to standard fax machines. The most reliable method of the 3.
  • Celery, available via mycelery email via fax machine. emails are sent as an image (write legibly and a little larger than usual!). works with [optional] color faxes to print emails with color images. you are notified by phone call that an email has been received. it recognizes Dear _____, (i.e. Dear AIMEE,) in block lettering as the recipient (note: this is NOT an email address, so you can't apparently send email to regular email addresses? maybe unless you make a specific entry). AIMEE is recognized as an entry in your email address book. may not be too reliable due to (? handwriting recognition) of email addresses. challenge-response eliminates spam (see blog post).
  • Presto Services Inc., available from presto $99.99+$9.99/mo. receive email only. prints to special HP printer.
Dialup, 24Kbps-48Kbps (because of SS7 and fiber multiplexing, usually 26.4kbps/14.4kbps)

I have seen dialup modems destroyed by storms here in Vancouver, WA. I suggest running your modem through a phone line surge protector, which may be built into better surge protector outlets or you can get one from Radio Shack - it won't mangle your signal or slow things down.

  • Copper.net $10/mo 888-336-3318 no software to mess up your machine. plain & simple dialup. high-speed dialup isn't worth it. their dialup has an additional service for about $3/mo which gives you something like caller id while you are online and notifies you of calls.
  • PeoplePC Online $11/mo 1-888-587-9669 or 1-877-947-3327 (appears to be system-intrusive like AOL: appears to replace wininet.dll & ras.dll. Has smart dialler. $16/mo AV+firewall+antispyware if you need that). comes with antivirus software. you must get the software first before you can connect, so chicken and egg syndrome. only way to get it is to call.
  • NetZero $10/mo 1-800-638-9376 (is probably system-intrusive like AOL: has AV,spam blocker if you need that). leaves port 4537 open even after software is uninstalled. comes with antivirus software. you must get the software first before you can connect, so chicken and egg syndrome.
  • Juno (netzero) has free dialup. Juno requires that you upgrade your software (a BIG download) every once in a while. you must get the software first before you can connect, so chicken and egg syndrome. it permanently modifies your IE browser with the Juno spinning logo) and has its own special email client that is not web email. so if you ever get off of Juno, you lose your emails (just lett you know in advance). there may be a way to save your emails (.eml) to disk, and open them with an email client or text editor like notepad or Notepad++ (which I highly recommend). Juno: I don't recommend Juno because its inbox or Juno gets corrupted often and you lose all your mail and settings, then you have to reinstall the last version you used and import your settings (IF that works - usually requires a working internet connection!) and restore Juno from a backup. Juno also has problems with Adobe Acrobat Reader 8.x upgrading for some reason. With Juno you can't use standard email clients like thunderbird or outlook - you can only use theirs. its backups are useless when your inbox is corrupted or comes from a different version of Juno - at most you will get your address book back and will be forced to redo your dialup access #s.

Note: your speed depends on whether your line is multiplexed, and whether your line uses fiber optics (I was told, they all do both now) or SS7+callerID boxes (according to Upgrading and Repairing PC's 17th Ed.). fiber optics reduces the speed to 24kbps permanently. So does SS7, which is part of the telco 'upgrades'. The combination of SS7 signaling and the use of a caller ID box on the same line will cause frequent disconnects & drop in connection speed, problems with reliability. I don't recommend Accelerated dialup. it's a waste of money and often the installed software just crashes. It is unknown to me whether the modem industry will handle the SS7 signaling problem with a new V. standard.

dialup is based on RS232 serial ports protocol, which has 1 start bit, and these days people have chosen by default an octet (8 data bits) for data, no parity, and 1 stop bit (instead of 2). that makes a total of 10 transmiission bits for every byte, making dialup even slower. 2 out of 10 of those transmission bits are overhead (which is 20%). so if you want to find out what your IEC KiB/s (usually what's reported in the browser) is multiply your bps by ((100-20)/100)/2^10=0.00078125, you can calculate this with ttcalc or a graphing calculator. for example, usually your data rate will be 26.4kbps/14.4kbps. this translates to 26400bps*((100-20)/100)/2^10=20.625KiBps, 14400bps*((100-20)/100)/2^10=11.25KiBps, 20.625KiBps/11.25KiBps.

All dialup providers offer "hi-speed" service, which basically compresses images and web pages and javascript to make things download faster on your browser. this requires software, as I said earlier, and it costs usually $15-16/mo. as opposed to $10/mo. I have tried it, it's a waste of money. most of the stuff I do is downloads anyway. web pages I don't notice any difference in speed. if you want speed, get DSL, DSL has 896kbps upload speed, which is 896/(14.4*(8/10))=77.777x faster.

Fiber-to-the-house (Broadband), 5/2Mbps-150/35Mbps, 40Mbps/20Mbps, 1Gbps

  • metrofi fiber 10Mbps-1Gbps - cable and telephone companies usually fight this as "competition"
  • google see fiber.google.com but right now (2013), they are in 2 states now and working on 4, but only in major cities where lots of people are helping requesting service for their city.
    • 5Mbps/1Mbps free ($300 install fee)
    • 1Gbps internet $70/mo
    • 1Gbps internet+120 channels
    • not available in all areas, very slow to adopt, only by popularity vote
  • comcast may be going fiber at some point
  • Verizon FiOS $50-230/mo no cap, shared line, now bought in some states by Frontier.
    RESIDENTIAL (3/10/2011):
    • Tier 1: 15/5Mbps $49.99/mo
    • Tier 2: 25/25Mbps $64.99/mo
    • Tier 3: 50/20Mbps $139.99/mo
    SMALL BUSINESS: (3/10/2011)
    • 15/5Mbps $94.99/mo, $64.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • 25/25Mbps $114.99/mo, $84.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • 35/35Mbps $129.99/mo, $99.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • 50/20Mbps $179.99/mo, $149.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • 150/35Mbps $229.99/mo, $199.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
  • Frontier FiOS $55-145/mo (to see the higher-end plans, click on "show additional plans" in small text). shared, although comcast has some limitations like a cap (max GB/mo).
    RESIDENTIAL (3/10/2011):
    • Tier 1: 15/5Mbps $54.99/mo
    • Tier 2: 25/25Mbps $69.99/mo
    • Tier 3: 50/20Mbps $144.99/mo
    SMALL BUSINESS: (3/10/2011)
    • 15/5Mbps $94.99/mo, $64.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • *25/25Mbps $114.99/mo, $84.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • *35/35Mbps $129.99/mo, $99.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • 50/20Mbps $179.99/mo, $149.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
    • 150/35Mbps $229.99/mo, $199.99/mo 2YR CONTRACT
  • centurylink (40Mbps/5Mbps fiber not available in all areas)
    RESIDENTIAL:
    • DSL 1.5Mbps/896kbps Residential Fiber $19.99/mo+$19.99activation without phone for 1st 6 months ($40/mo after 12 mo)
    • DSL? 7Mbps/896kbps Residential Fiber $19.99/mo+$19.99activation without phone for 1st 6 months ($45/mo after 12 mo)
    • 12Mbps/896kbps Residential Fiber $19.99/mo+$19.99activation without phone for 1st 6 months ($50/mo after 12 mo)
    • 20Mbps/896kbps Residential Fiber $19.99/mo+$19.99activation without phone for 1st 6 months ($60/mo after 12 mo) - not available in all areas
    • 40Mbps/5Mbps Residential Fiber $19.99/mo+$19.99activation without phone for 1st 6 months ($70/mo after 12 mo) - not available in all areas
    SMALL BUSINESS (centurylink small business, Large business (see menu)):

Fiber Optics to the house. base is same cheaper than cable and slightly faster, but has a higher upper limit on speed. if you transfer a lot of files, this may be the way to go.
Don't plug in your router the first time you have set up your connection software and modem directly through a computer first. Nothing will work until you do.
You might want to choose a gigabit router for this that has a gigabit switch built-in, such as an older Linksys model if you plan to do much internal networking. Use Cat5e (preferably) or Cat6 cables - those handle gigabit.
I suggest you get a small separate ISOBAR surge supressor strip just for the modem [& router] - it will eliminate the possibility of line noise & eliminate most storm damage. This will also allow you to cycle the power on both when needed (but unplug the router and let the router power up last after modem is up solid).

Choose FIOS 25Mbps/25Mbps or 35Mbps/35Mbps plan if you are uploading .ISO files to a web server. FiOS comes with a wireless router.

Always power up the router AFTER the modem has come up!

news: 300Mbps coming to comcast, verizon

MetroFi fiber (metro broadband, 1Mbps-1Gbps)

Note:cable and telephone companies fight against lower-cost, faster municipality-owned fiber because it's "competition".

Backhaul (10-1+Gbps)

just google backhaul and your city and state.

with backhaul, you need to erect a pole or attach the thing to a side of a building or a tower. someplace up above buildings (talk to them about requirements if you are serious about this). you will also need to drill a hole into the building to your network closet if you have one, for the network cable, and seal the hole for weather/bugs/etc.

one thing you can try is google your state's name and append " microwave backhaul" or whatever type of backhaul you might be looking for. (example: "montana microwave backhaul"). just google "wireless backhaul" and you should get some ads from google listing some backhaul equipment companies touting their wares. take a look at what they have, and do some digging to find more kinds. I have only listed a few that I have found based on ads.

ROUTER: If you are going to get a router for this, I would suggest you contact Cisco and confer with a consultant to find a solution that would work for you. off-the-shelf routers are going to limit your bandwidth! it's probably going to be somewhere around $1000 for the router I should think, but don't quote me on it.

[A]DSL (Broadband), 256kbps/256Kbps, 1.5Mbps/896Kbps, [3Mbps/896Kbps] 7Mbps/896Kbps

You must have a phone line for DSL to work but you don't have to pay for phone service. you must get your DSL from your phone company that covers your area. filters must be installed on all phones, faxes (sorry, no direct faxes on DSL! try 8x8 fax service over ethernet (FOIP)), answering machines, and other telephone devices - 4 are provided in the package (1 may be a flat wall-mount with a filter on the side, the thru jack on the front is for the modem: See your wiring diagram) + there may be an extra filter jack built-in to the modem. The ActionTec modem has a firewall - more recent models I am told are fully configurable routers and some are wireless (but have a weak signal - get a router with rangemax or a MIMO router).
I have seen dialup modems destroyed by storms here in Vancouver, WA. I suggest running your DSL modem through a phone line surge protector, which may be built into better surge protector outlets or you can get one from Radio Shack - it may or may not mangle your signal or slow things down.

Don't go for 1Mbps DSL if you need streamed video. get at least 7Mbps for download rate. this is what support told us we needed for internet streamed video (church services, youtube, Godtube, vimeo, etc).

Not only do you have to pay for the DSL, that $19.95/mo price you also have to pay for a phone line which is another $25/mo or so. ASK and PROD if you have to. that total bill will be yours. the advertised price isn't true. it's not $20/mo.

DSL is 896/(14.4*(8/10))=77.777x faster than dialup.

Get line protection and any other kinds of protection you can. it will save you money down the road if something happens! and I have seen things happen.

  • centurylink/Live (read the find print!!) (you might be able to change from Live.com if nou need webspace). They offer 256Kbps/256Kbps, 1.5Mbps/896Kbps ($36.95, defaults to $49.95), 3-7Mbps/896Kbps. 896Kbps upload is faster than comcast's lowest. 12Mbps/896kbps and 40Mbps/5Mbps. you may be able to get centurylink DSL for $14.95/mo for the first year through Whitefence.com (depends on offers available in your area). it takes 3 days to get DSL service.
    • 1.5Mbps/896Kbps Residential DSL $29.99/mo+19.99activation without phone ($30/mo after 12 mo)
    • 7Mbps/896kbps Residential DSL $29.99/mo+19.99activation without phone ($35.99/mo after 12 mo)
    • 12Mbps/896Kbps Residential Fiber $29.99/mo+19.99activation without phone ($49.99/mo after 12 mo)
    • 20Mbps/896Kbps Residential Fiber $29.99/mo+19.99activation without phone ($59.99/mo after 12 mo)
    • 40Mbps/5Mbps Residential Fiber $29.99/mo+19.99activation without phone ($89.99/mo after 12 mo)
  • ATT.com DSL ($20/mo 1.5Mbps, $30/mo 3.0Mbps) free modem & installation kit, (comes with anti-spam, anti-spyware, etc. & email protection, popup stopper, email switching tools, parental controls) supposed to be another good no-nonsense dialup. click the "change location" button to get at the dialup stuff. 6 email id's. not available for everyone.
  • Copper.net $32-55/mo 888-336-3318 no software to mess up your machine. plain & simple DSL.
  • Stephouse enterprise-class services in Portland, OR area) 503-548-2000/1-877-622-4678. business DSL:
    • centurylink SOHO 256k/256k $88.95/mo+$5/mo
    • centurylink SOHO 1.5MB/896k $88.95/mo+$5/mo
    • centurylink SOHO 1.5MB/896k(Standalone) $88.95/mo+$5/mo
    • centurylink SOHO 3-5MB/896k Monthly $108.95/mo+$5/mo
    • centurylink SOHO 3-5MB/896k(Standalone) $108.95/mo+$5/mo
    • centurylink Corporate 768k/128k $64.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • centurylink Corporate 1.5MB/128k $64.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • centurylink Corporate 1.5MB/384k $64.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • centurylink Corporate 3MB/768k $99.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • centurylink Corporate 5MB/768k $114.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • centurylink Corporate 7.1MB/768k $129.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • Verizon 768k/128k $64.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • Verizon 1.5MB/128k $64.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • Verizon 1.5MB/384k $64.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • Verizon 3MB/768k $99.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • Verizon 5MB/768k $114.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
    • Verizon 7.1MB/768k $129.95/mo+$60.00+$99.00
  • online northwest 503-883-9200 866.876.4052
    • business priority service "fast" 5Mbps business:$100+$49.95/mo corporate:$100+$79.95/mo
    • business priority service "super fast" 9Mbps business:$100+$69.95/mo corporate:$100+$99.95/mo
    • business priority service business:$100+$89.95/mo corporate:$100+$119.95/mo
    • residential "ultra fast" 12Mbps $69.95/mo (1 year agreement req'd)

Note: Extra filters can be acquired at CompUSA, Radio Shack, and similar computer stores that carry networking supplies. yes, the big flat metal hanging wall-jack is used for your DSL line (or plug your modem essentially directly into the wall (hopefully through a surge protector), so your modem, router, and one Vista/XP/2000 computer should be located there. Sorry, windows ME/98 are not supported for the centurylink installation process. Once the router is up though, you can plug in your win9x and winME computers just fine (into a router), even wirelessly. I suggest you don't choose MSN on your centurylink - it's easy to mess up and it's a hassle, and the software breaks a lot (and it doesn't work under anything less than Windows 2000/XP/Vista).
Don't plug in your router the first time you have set up your connection software and modem directly through a computer first. Nothing will work until you do.
You can get modem lockups sue to spyware and due to power spikes. I suggest you get a small separate ISOBAR surge supressor strip just for the modem [& router] - it will eliminate the possibility of line noise & eliminate most expensive storm damage (and reconfig time!). This will also allow you to cycle the power on both when needed (but unplug the router and let the router power up last after modem is up solid).
Always power up the router AFTER the modem has come up!
Modern-day DSL modems contain routers/gateways now. a router isn't really necessary. however, if you are looking for wireless range, you should probably get a wired modem and a MIMO router or other long-range router.

VDSL (Broadband), up to 100Mbps

You must have a phone line for DSL to work but you don't have to pay for phone service. you must get your DSL from your phone company that covers your area. filters must be installed on all phones, faxes (sorry, no direct faxes on DSL! try Packet8 FAX service over IP, plug in FAX machine), answering machines, and other telephone devices - 4 are provided in the package (1 may be a flat wall-mount with a filter on the side, the thru jack on the front is for the modem: See your wiring diagram) + there may be an extra filter jack built-in to the modem. some modems are wireless, depends on what you want when you buy the service or which modem you buy.
I have seen dialup modems destroyed by storms here in Vancouver, WA. I suggest running your DSL modem through a phone line surge protector, which may be built into better surge protector outlets or you can get one from Radio Shack - it may or may not mangle your signal or slow things down.

Not only do you have to pay for the DSL, I *think* you also have to pay for the phone line, but I am not sure about that. ASK.

Get line protection and any other kinds of protection you can. it will save you money down the road if something happens! and I have seen things happen.

Note: Apparently fiber-optic lines are a bonus, shortening the total telco wire length (wire must be <4000' or 1219m). The shorter, the faster: Verizon specs it at no more than 600' which gives 100Mbps. Extra filters can be acquired at CompUSA, Radio Shack, and similar computer stores that carry networking supplies. yes, the big flat metal wall-jack is used for your DSL line (or plug your modem essentially directly into the wall (hopefully through a surge protector), so your modem, router, and one Vista/XP/2000 computer should be located there. Sorry, windows ME/98 are not supported for the centurylink installation process. Once the router is up though, you can plug in your win9x and winME computers just fine (into a router), even wirelessly. I suggest you don't choose MSN on your centurylink - it's easy to mess up and it's a hassle, and the software breaks a lot (and it doesn't work under anything less than Windows 2000/XP/Vista).
Don't plug in your router the first time you have set up your connection software and modem directly through a computer first. Nothing will work until you do.
You can get modem lockups due to spyware and due to power spikes. I suggest you get a small separate ISOBAR surge supressor strip just for the modem [& router] - it will eliminate the possibility of line noise & eliminate most expensive storm damage (and reconfig time!). This will also allow you to cycle the power on both when needed (but unplug the router and let the router power up last after modem is up solid).
Always power up the router AFTER the modem has come up!
Modern-day DSL modems contain routers/gateways now. a router isn't really necessary. however, if you are looking for wireless range, you should probably get a wired modem and a MIMO router or other long-range router.

ARTICLES: what is VDSL(wisegeek),

Cable (Broadband) 1Mbps-104Mbps (peak) - higher speeds available upon special request (can go to 1Gbps)

  • Xfinity(Comcast). business has no 300GB usage cap and you pay $30/mo extra, not sure what else comes with that.
    • RESIDENTIAL(data size cap) (4/2013):
    • Performance(20Mbps/2Mbps)$62.95/mo
    • (default) Blast!(50Mbps/10Mbps)$72.95/mo
    • Extreme 105(105Mbps/20Mbps)$114.95/mo
    • Economy(1Mbps/384k)$42.95/mo $24.95/mo(price requires TV or voice)
    • Fast Pack Nationwide 3g/4g [eligibility criteria](???Mbps/???kbps)$69.99($97.95)/mo+$49activation+$9.95shipping+5¢/MBabove5GB/mo3g+$1roamingabove100MB/mo3g
    • Fast Pack Metro 3g/4g [eligibility criteria](???Mbps/???kbps)$54.99($82.95)/mo+$49activation+$9.95shipping+5¢/MBabove5GB/mo3g+$1roamingabove100MB/mo3g
    • BUSINESS (no data size cap):
    • Deluxe50(50Mbps/10Mbps)$189.95/mo
    • Premium(22Mbps/5Mbps)$99.95/mo
    • Starter(12Mbps/2Mbps)$????/mo
    The higher rates are not available in all areas. Excessive use is 250GB/mo (gaming doesn't come up to this) - still, now that everyone has the 50Mbps rate, that same cap is still there! Comcast doesn't have a specific link I can just insert in this list due to the "what's your address?". sorry. If you already have service at that address, they will refer you to the comcast phone number: 1-888-COMCAST (1-888-266-2278). They implement PowerBoost, which gives you more than your bandwidth in an exponential curve that ramps down to your download rate within a minute or 3. So if you see this, don't get excited - you are getting more than your share of bandwidth. They also implement "Network Management" on peer-to-peer networking (such as file sharing protocols). They will notify you by phone if you are an "excessive user" ("using more than a business uses over a T1 line in a month", which is about 1.544e6/10*8hrsPerDay*4wksPerMo*5DysPerWk*3600secPerHr/1e9=88GB?). available as of Feb 2008 are 6Mbps/384kbps, 8Mbps/768Kbps, and an 8Mbps/768Kbps with 12Mbps/? for long downloads/uploads. Configuration Note: our particular comcast location no longer requires setting the router's hostname and domain as of Nov 9, 2008. You will want to choose FIOS or high-end comcast or DSL(768k) if you are uploading .ISO files to a web server. You can probably sign up for a slightly cheaper package deal through whitefence.com.
  • time warner cable
  • cablemover.com - move your cable

linksys docsis 3.0 cable modem, 304Mbps/120Mbps

Note: older cable modems and routers lock up periodically and need to be reset once every few months, and they generate heat and don't like to be in hot places. To reduce the problems with the need for resetting, I suggest you get a small separate ISOBAR surge supressor strip just for the modem & router - it will eliminate the possibility of line noise & eliminate most storm damage. This will also allow you to cycle the power on both when needed (but unplug the router and let the router power up last after modem is up solid). coax line quality can also affect the modem. a separate branch line for the modem works best.

having speed issues and you have house ethernet wiring closet? check your connections. try a different port. I was getting 0-1Mbps/10Mbps flaky and it was caused by a bad connector wiring in the wall somehow that had degraded for whatever reason. I may have to rewire it with the 110 punch down tool. I switched ports and all was good. turns out it was not the switch, though I cleaned it out good with canned air (needed it after a couple of years) - the netgear prosafe unmanaged 24-port switches are nicely maintainable. I see from the ethernet wiring diagram that RX is the green pair and TX is orange, so my problem is most likely with RX (green pair). I thought it was my ISP, but I was wrong, when I discovered other machines in the house were getting 50Mbps and I was getting 1Mbps or less, flaky. wasn't the antivirus firewall settings or some oddball traffic rule.

comcast charges $10/mo for "free" upgrades to service, like the upcoming upgrade from 50Mbps to 105Mbps and from 22Mbps to 50Mbps. it's policy despite the letters. according to some web sites, one hand does not know what the other hand is doing, which might be why you have lower echelons saying one thing and higher-ups saying another. also, the upgradce may not be successful, but they will still be charging you the extra $10/mo.

in 2014 comcast usage cap was upgraded from 250GB to 300GB after 10 years. I would like to see it gone for good. a lot more people do gaming and lots of online video now and are hitting the limit. also in 2014 is the possible time-warner/comcast merger, where comcast gets bigger. I am told Japan has 1Gbps and Korea has 100Mbps.

Don't plug in your router first. set up your cable modem, run the software, and register your modem [over the phone?] first. don't give the technician permission to touch your computer if you can avoid it - perform the computer steps yourself as guided by them with great caution regarding msconfig - irreversable damage to your software packages can result and you may have to reinstall all your applications. the technician I worked with was trained to wipe out all the startup programs - that included my antivirus, database, cd burning program, paint program, and a lot of other programs which were valid. Maybe they have changed their policy by now (I think they have), but I had no peace about that at the time, and I was right - things broke right and left afterwards.

today it's OK to have your router and modem plugged into the same power strip. firmware has gotten better. time you have set up your connection software and modem directly through a computer first. some older routers seem to not like it if router is powered up before or at same time as modem. if you have problems connecting, power up router after modem is up and see what happens.

Comcast in apartment, but not a house has a problem with its service. when I lived in an apartment complex, some days I get 174kbps way late at night, and during the day/evenings I get 33-64kbps. dialup speed pretty much, which is same as outage. cable usage per area is dense in apartment complexes so it probably overloads the servers, at 1-2am, service used to drop out for at least several hours, I never stayed up long enough to figure out how long. so if you are counting on comcast for high-bandwidth uploads, get high-bandwidth internet and start it in the morning! this is not usually a problem after I moved. not a fun situation. btw, wifi is awful in an apartment complex too, channel availability shifts every week and things that used to work don't any more etc.

Cable is a "shared" internet connection, meaning your bandwidth is reduced if other people are using cable internet in your area. so at times everybody can get really slow performance depending on what time of day you are on.

105Mbps was supposed to come to Cable in 2008. What happened was that 50Mbps service was offered to residential customers at a high price. in late march 2013 50Mbps/10Mbps service was made the default at comcast - all you have to do is power-cycle your modem and maybe your router too, once and you have it, a docsis 3.0 modem is required. I highly suggest you buy the linksys modem instead of renting a modem at $7/mo, it pays for itself in less than a year, and it handles up to 304Mbps/152Mbps if/when it comes. article 1, article2 about Docsis 3.0 304Mbps cable to come in 2010 (already here, it's the 50Mbps service, soon to be 100Mbps). see article on comcast 50Mbps service and docsis 3.0 modems.

HOW TO READ CABLE MODEM SPECS: docsis 3.0 modems are 38Mbps per channel. when you look at modem specs, see how many channels it can handle. if it says 8 downstream (download), 4 upstream (upload), or 8,4, you have a 304Mbps/152Mbps modem. if it has no specs, don't buy it. one modem is 4,4 so it does 152Mbps/152Mbps maximum. google the manual for yours. if it's a gateway, it means it has a router built into it and may or may not have wifi (wireless).

news: 304Mbps coming to comcast, verizon. well, this is an old article now, but we have a linksys modem that is DOCSIS 3.0 8,4 channels which fits the bill. note that this linksys modem probably requires a gigabit, not 100Mbps ethernet. so you should have a router where the internet and switch ports BOTH are 10/100/1000Mbps. look at specs before buying one, because some are 100Mbps at the internet port and 1Gbps at the switch ports and this will not do - it will probably work, but you will be getting 1/3 what you are paying monthly for, and it won't handle future modem upgrades.

given that we have 105Mbps now, I am guessing there will either be another 50Mbps speed bump upgrade to 152Mbps or a whole new version of DOCSIS or some other technologuy like FTTH (Fiber To The House) will be required. I have not seen any new equipment being talked about. gigabit was supposed to be on the way, but I don't know what that would look like, but I know it's either not DOCSIS 3.0 or you would have to have a huge number of channels in DOCSIS 3.0 like 32 channels (1.216Gbps). comcast already has a fiber network, so it would just be a matter of doing the Customer Premesis stuff which is currently copper. here's something to think about:

IF comcast does 1.2Gbps (32 channels?), using a gigabit router will not solve the problem. again, it will work, but you will be losing 200Mbps. next year wigig (802.11ad) should be introduced. 802.11ad (7Gbps) has a shorter range than 802.11ac (867Mbps). you also have the choice of gigabit ethernet, which will be far faster. if this is acceptable, an 802.11ac router should be the best solution for a router to get max speed. if router firmware has not already stabilized yet, it should soon I hope. if range is not a problem, 802.11ad (7Gbps) would give you full 1.2Gbps speed. hopefully it will give you the range you need within your house. some people have multistory houses and this could be an issue.

Satellite (broadband) - dish 700Kbps-16Mbps

  • 1/20/2012 HughesNet $40-100/mo+($200setup or $50lease)
    • Power 10Mbps/1Mbps, 10GB cap $39.99/mo
    • Power Pro 10Mbps/2Mbps, 15GB cap $79.99/mo
    • PowerMax 15Mbps/2Mbps, 20GB Cap $99.99/mo
  • WildBlue $50/mo (good for outlying areas that don't normally have internet access), up to 1.5Mbps download speeds
    • 512kbps/128kbps 7.5GB/2.3GB Cap, $49.95/mo 2yr contract
    • 1Mbps/200kbps 12GB/3GB Cap, $69.95/mo 2yr contract
    • 1.5Mbps/256kbps 17GB/5GB Cap, $49.95/mo 2yr contract

Note: satellite is subject to dropouts due to airplanes flying overhead and rainy or other such weather - anything that could block the line-of-sight communication between the dish and the satellite could cause a dropout, and would take some time to recover I am told. I do not know if the recovery time has changed since I last checked in 2002.

satellite has an extremely long delay in both directions (to, from satellite). earth to satellite to earth. fine for TV. bad for internet.

may be needed if you need to get internet in middle of nowhere.

and note this: TCP portion of TCP/IP works by sending a packet and waiting for a reply. no reply in about 2 minutes, then it sends the packet again. so take into account your delays in both directions and that doubles the length of your trip... TCP does this over and over for one file transfer.

3G/4G Mobile/Cell Broadband Wireless (broadband) - kbps

All these cards are Wi-Fi enabled and work off the EDGE network.

Note: Good for outlying areas where there is no normal internet access.
There is a router available that looks like a pyramid that only takes PCMCIA cards. Check your router manual first, but you may have set up your connection software and modem directly through a computer first before inserting your modem into the router. The router may not work until you do.
I suggest you get a small separate ISOBAR surge supressor strip just for the modem [& router] - it will eliminate the possibility of line noise & eliminate most storm damage. This will also allow you to cycle the power on both when needed (but unplug the router and let the router power up last after modem is up solid).
I don't know if they allow routers on satellite connections yet or not. they didn't used to. it used to be box-per-computer with DirecWay (now HughesNet).

[Carrier Class] Wireless (broadband) - dish 384K-8Mbps

  • Air Speed ($60/mo res, $99/mo bus) for Clark County, WA. 360-835-1000
    • residential 384kbps/384kbps $59.99+$249.99setup
    • residential 768kbps/768kbps $69.99+$249.99setup
    • residential 1Mbps/1Mbps $79.99+$249.99setup
    • business redundant wireless T1 or OC3 1-8Mbps wireless $179.99+$300setup
    • business metro ethernet
    • business private net
  • Infinity Internet ($149/mo+) enterprise class services for WA. 360-835-1000 [1.5-45Mbps, T1-DS3/T3 speeds]. guarantees 99.99% network uptime.
  • Stephouseinstallation is $99. enterprise-class services in Portland, OR: 98209,97204,97203,97205 and Woodland, WA area) 503-548-2000/1-877-622-4678 you may get a dish on the side of your building(?), but then again it could be an indoor modem.
    • residential 1Mbps/256kbps $19.99/mo
    • residential 3Mbps/384Kbps $35/mo
    • residential 6Mbps/768Kbps $45/mo
    • residential 10Mbps/1Mbps $55/mo
    • residential 15Mbps/1Mbps $65/mo
    • residential 20Mbps/1Mbps $75/mo
    • business 3Mbps/768Kbps $55/mo
    • business 6Mbps/1Mbps $75/mo
    • business 10Mbps/1.5Mbps $99/mo
    • business 15Mbps/2Mbps $149/mo
    • business 20Mbps/3Mbps $175/mo
  • online northwest 503-883-9200 866.876.4052
    • residential "value" 1-3Mbps/0-1Mbps ($99 2yr contract or $199 1yr contract or $299 month-to-month)+$49.95/mo 2yr contract
    • residential "power" 2-5Mbps/0-2Mbps ($99 2yr contract or $199 1yr contract or $299 month-to-month)+$64.95/mo 1yr contract
    • residential "turbo" 3-8Mbps/0-2.5Mbps ($99 2yr contract or $199 1yr contract or $299 month-to-month)+$79.95/mo 2yr contract
    • residential "extreme" 5-11Mbps/0-3Mbps ($99 2yr contract or $199 1yr contract or $299 month-to-month)+$99.95/mo 2yr contract
    • business "soho" $59.95/mo 1-3 devices
    • business "small business" $99.95/mo 5-10 devices
    • business "enterprise" $149.95/mo 10+ devices, VOIP

Note: you get a dish on the side of your building. Good for outlying areas where there is no normal internet access.
Don't plug in your router the first time you have set up your connection software and modem directly through a computer first. Nothing will work until you do.
I suggest you get a small separate ISOBAR surge supressor strip just for the modem [& router] - it will eliminate the possibility of line noise & eliminate most storm damage. This will also allow you to cycle the power on both when needed (but unplug the router and let the router power up last after modem is up solid).

WiMax Wireless (broadband) - (T1 speeds - 1.544Mbps+, 1Mbps-6Mbps/1Mbps,IEEE802.16m/WirelessMAN Advanced/WiMAX-2 300Mbps/? net 100Mbps

  • Stephouse enterprise-class services in Portland, OR area) 503-548-2000/1-877-622-4678 you may get a dish on the side of your building(?), but then again it could be an indoor modem.
    • T1[1.544Mbps]
    • T3/DS3[44.736Mbps]
    • Fiber grade[14Tbps?]
  • Clear $35 activation,modem lease $4.99/mo, Portland, OR and Vancouver Metro Area currently but is spreading. Indoor modem. outages on a regular basis. signal goes up and down for unknown reasons. I get about 1-3 out of 5 or it is searching for signal. ethernet modem works with router. least expensive broadband. If you sign up on the web it's a 2-year agreement.
    • HOME:
    • basic home, 768kbps/384kbps, 2 email accounts, $25.37/mo
    • fast home, 3Mbps/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $30/mo
    • pick 1 unlimited home, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $45/mo
    • MOBILE:
    • 2GB mobile 4Mbps/1Mbps, $10/1GB over 2GB, 2 email accounts, $35/mo
    • pick 1 unlimited mobile, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, unlimited usage, 2 email accounts, $45/mo
    • 4G+ Mobile Internet, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $70/mo
    • Mondi 2GB Promo, $10 per 1GB over 2GB, 4Mbps/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $35/mo
    • Mondi Unlimited Promo, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $45/mo
    • SMALL OFFICE/HOME OFFICE:
    • Fast Office, unlimited usage, 4Mbps/1Mbps, 4 email accounts, $55/mo
    • Faster Office, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 8 email accounts, $75/mo
    • Professional 2GB Mobile, $10 per 1GB over 2 GB, 4Mbps/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $40/mo+$35 activation
    • Professional Unlimited Mobile, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, unlimited usage, $50/mo+$35 activation
    • 4G+ Mobile Internet, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, unlimited usage, $70/mo+$35 activation fee
    • 15GB Shared Mobile, 6Mbps/1Mbps, $10 per 1GB over 15GB, $100/mo
    • 30GB Shared Mobile, 6Mbps/1Mbps, $10 per 1GB over 30GB, $120/mo
    • BUNDLES:
    • Pick 2 Unlimited: Home & Mobile, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $60/mo+$17.50 activation
    • Pick 2 Unlimited: Mobile & Mobile, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $60/mo+$17.50 activation
    • Voice Bundle, Clear Voice, 3Mbps/1Mbps, unlimited usage, $55/mo+$35 activation
    • Pick 3 Unlimited, mobile+home+voice, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $80/mo+$17.50 activation

Note: Clear (Clearwire) is available in Portland OR and Vancouver, WA to my knowledge, but supposed to be national soon. Modem is large, flat and well ventilated (vertical) and installs indoors, and doesn't require a technician.

See wikipedia article. There can be slowdowns and disconnects. line-of-sight. "throughputs are often closer to 2 Mbit/s symmetric at 10 km with fixed WiMAX and a high gain antenna."

Some Laptops have WiMAX ability. higher data rates coming with 326Mbps/86Mbps LTE - tell 'em if you want it! (wimax currently at 10Mbps/1Mbps max)

Transceiver tower coming near you. USB modem for mobile available, uses high-quality Skycross antenna. Modem has ethernet connection and works with a router.

it used to be what they first started out that if you signed up on the web, it was a 2 year contract and they didn't tell you about that ( only option) until after you printed the invoice. they have since fixed that. They now have month-to-month service, which is cool, and their bandwidth for transmitting has gone up on some of their products!

Stephouse/WiMAX Good for outlying areas where there is no normal internet access.
Don't plug in your router the first time you have set up your connection software and modem directly through a computer first. Nothing will work until you do.
I suggest you get a small separate ISOBAR surge supressor strip just for the modem [& router] - it will eliminate the possibility of line noise & eliminate most storm damage. This will also allow you to cycle the power on both when needed (but unplug the router and let the router power up last after modem is up solid).

Airspan makes a easy CPE that clearwire/clear doesn't use that is non-line-of-sight (NLOS) and uses the Intel rosedale chipset and includes VoIP and WiFi capabilities. They also make a Pro CPE for outdoor deplotment that has a 4-port LAN, 802.1q VLAN port switching, VoIP IAD, up to 16 SSID's, optional integral 802.11b/g WiFi AP. The catch is, the ISP must also use their ?backhaul? equipment. so it's not a simple switchover. If you want 100Mbps WiMAX, you want backhaul (a feedhorn on a tower I think).

A newer article than that (Mar 24, 2010) can be found at pcworld.com business center.

Airspan makes a easy CPE that clearwire/clear doesn't use that is non-line-of-sight (NLOS) and uses the Intel rosedale chipset and includes VoIP and WiFi capabilities. They also make a Pro CPE for outdoor deplotment that has a 4-port LAN, 802.1q VLAN port switching, VoIP IAD, up to 16 SSID's, optional integral 802.11b/g WiFi AP. The catch is, the ISP must also use their ?backhaul? equipment. so it's not a simple switchover. If you want 100Mbps WiMAX, you want backhaul (a feedhorn on a tower I think). LTE is already being implemented by clear.net mixed with WiMAX.

and by the way, Clear has said it is sticking with WiMAX, rather than go with 45Mbps LTE. They joined with Sprint. I didn't understand this as a "forward kind of statement", until I read the IEEE standard recommendation! WiMAX, to my best understanding, has no caps and is not "shared" like comcast.

3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) Cellular (broadband) - (TCP/IP protocol, 326Mbps/86Mbps-1Gbps but TCP goodput tests show 42.8Mbps/5.3Mbps, some tests show average of 25Mbps-1Gbps for advanced.)

  • LTE (telecommunications) - wikipedia
  • LTE advanced (1Gbps) - wikipedia
  • Clear and clearwire $35 activation,modem lease $4.99/mo, Portland, OR and Vancouver Metro Area currently but is spreading. Indoor modem. outages on a regular basis. signal goes up and down for unknown reasons. I get about 1-3 out of 5 or it is searching for signal. ethernet modem works with router. least expensive broadband. you can choose a 2-year agreement or monthly.
    • HOME:
    • basic home, 768kbps/384kbps, 2 email accounts, $25.37/mo
    • fast home, 3Mbps/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $30/mo
    • pick 1 unlimited home, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $45/mo
    • MOBILE:
    • 2GB mobile 4Mbps/1Mbps, $10/1GB over 2GB, 2 email accounts, $35/mo
    • pick 1 unlimited mobile, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, unlimited usage, 2 email accounts, $45/mo
    • 4G+ Mobile Internet, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $70/mo
    • Mondi 2GB Promo, $10 per 1GB over 2GB, 4Mbps/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $35/mo
    • Mondi Unlimited Promo, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $45/mo
    • SMALL OFFICE/HOME OFFICE:
    • Fast Office, unlimited usage, 4Mbps/1Mbps, 4 email accounts, $55/mo
    • Faster Office, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 8 email accounts, $75/mo
    • Professional 2GB Mobile, $10 per 1GB over 2 GB, 4Mbps/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, $40/mo+$35 activation
    • Professional Unlimited Mobile, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, unlimited usage, $50/mo+$35 activation
    • 4G+ Mobile Internet, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, 2 email accounts, unlimited usage, $70/mo+$35 activation fee
    • 15GB Shared Mobile, 6Mbps/1Mbps, $10 per 1GB over 15GB, $100/mo
    • 30GB Shared Mobile, 6Mbps/1Mbps, $10 per 1GB over 30GB, $120/mo
    • BUNDLES:
    • Pick 2 Unlimited: Home & Mobile, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $60/mo+$17.50 activation
    • Pick 2 Unlimited: Mobile & Mobile, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $60/mo+$17.50 activation
    • Voice Bundle, Clear Voice, 3Mbps/1Mbps, unlimited usage, $55/mo+$35 activation
    • Pick 3 Unlimited, mobile+home+voice, unlimited usage, unlimited[10Mbps]/1Mbps, $80/mo+$17.50 activation
    • Note - their plans have changed.

results of LTE TCP/IP network tests

Municipal wimax and disaster response

1/20/2013 Free WiFi Networks

Note: most are 802.11b or g networks. This is a starting list - Intel and jiwire have a really big list. "The best protection is just to always be aware of the interface you plug into. Change your passwords frequently and connect through a provider that offers an encrypted site using a VPN. Look for certified equipment and providers and ASK QUESTIONS before you log on. If you have doubts, DON'T SIGN ON."

Dialup (26.4kbps-56kbps, usually 26.4kbps with today's fiber optic multiplexed phone lines and other reasons)

  • www.copper.net, $9.95/mo regular dialup, $14.95/mo highspeed dialup, $19.95/mo+ broadband (DSL, etc). no antivirus or other software that breaks, unless you are using highspeed. copper.net also offers DSL and other things.
  • www.netzero.net, $9.95/mo regular dialup w spam protection on email, $14.95/mo dialup highspeed w spam protection on email. (that works with windows 98! but extremely SLOWLY). software requires reinstallation often. they also offer mobile broadband with caps and DSL $9.95/mo (which has modem with firewall, includes spam and spyware protection).
  • www.juno.com, $10.95/mo also offers free dialup service from. it has its own modified browser and email client and you are locked into its software and you can't get your email out or use your own email client. bought by netzero. large software by netzero requires upgrades once in a while with you have to either download or (probably buy) a disc. they offer DSL also.

Not only do you have to pay for the dialup, you also have to pay for the phone line(!).

Get line protection and any other kinds of protection you can. it will save you money down the road if something happens! and I have seen things happen.

There is now a dialup router that doubles as a wireless broadband router. cool tool.

Warning: Even though AOL offers broadband and dialup, I do not recommend AOL because of the intrusive nature of its TCP/IP networking drivers: they embed themselves into the operating system, take over and replace the TCP/IP stack, and never come out, even if you uninstall all of AOL's parts. The only way I know of is to format the hard disk and reinstall the operating system. There are other cd-based ISP's I do not trust such as older versions of Netzero which I could find no uninstall, but they seem better behaved than AOL.
Do not insert an AOL CD into the computer! it installs immediately. I hope AOL changes its tactics. DO NOT insert an AOL disc of any kind, even a game.

T-Carrier (64kbps-400.352Mbps, comes from a phone company)

see wikipedia article and public domain Federal Govt article and public domain federal govt paper. T-Carriers are essentially raw high-speed data lines from the phone company (can be fiber[OC] or copper). usually it is charged by the minute.

Other very high-speed connections (lotsa dough, special network interfaces)

  • OC 1/3/3c/12/24/48/192/768 a.k.a. STM-1/4/16/64/256: Optical Carrier transmission rates - wikipedia

TrippLite ISOBARs - the best Surge Protectors for your internet/networking equipment
ISOBARs are the best in surge protection. you are better off to look in the surge protector section of my web site. there are some really good ones in there with line conditioning! you should know that the Joules rating is one of the things you look at in a surge suppressor - the higher the better there is an 8-outlet that does 2850 Joules. other things to know about are clamping voltage, etc, but ISOBAR shines in that respect. One thing about an ISOBAR compared to other surge protector strips is that it its case is made with metal, so it is not very likely to cause a fire (as many a plastic one have been known to do). A power conditioner adds an extra level of protection to your system. If I remember right, it protects from brownouts and the like.
TrippLite ISOBAR H10DBS, available from neewegg.com $100, nextag.com $60-272
3570 Joules. Power Conditioner / Surge Protector, 8 outlets, 8ft cord, (4 outlets spaced for adapters), coax protection
TrippLite ISOBARs, available from newegg.com $50-400,

What slows down the internet for some folks with broadband

I have done a lot of studying on this subject, because it has pestered me a lot!

I have studied bit rates with the following hardware and software to test with:

  • 2004-era linksys wrt54gs router
  • 2004-era linksys wrt100 router
  • 2011-era linksys E4200 router
  • 2004-era 32-bit Dell Dimension 4600 xp computer, Pentium 4 Ht 2.8GHs, 1C 2-Thread, 3GiB RAM
  • 2013-era i7-3970x with 64GiB RAM, 6C, 12-thread
  • mcafee Total Protection 2012
  • Norton 360 2013

what I have discovered is the following:

  • the antivirus's firewall acts like an internet proxy, meaning it is a software go-between between the internet and the rest of the computer.
  • because of the above "proxiness" of firewalls, the software CAN be a major slow-down point IF your cpu is really old, as in 2004-era. this does not mean you should disable your firewall. these days a firewall helps to keep the bad guys and worms out.
  • older (as in 2004-era) routers mean a slower connection. if you are using the newer, faster internet comcast/xfinity gave you but you are getting no speed increase, try taking the router out of the equation and connecting directly to your pc. if you get a sudden speed increase, there's your problem, it's the router you are using, or it's the firmware. least expensive solution is to upgrade your firmware.
  • dd-wrt can in some cases actually be slower than your commercial router firmware, and they tell you this up front when it's appropriate. however, it IS full-featured and enterprise-class! and some routers like the ASUS RT-AC66U are made with it. and the router is fast, and asus has worked closely with dd-wrt to make the firmware, so it's good.
  • if you have a 2004-era XP box, get a new machine. it makes a definite speed dent, because of the software firewall issue. a system bogged down by a firewall software can only slurp the internet so fast. don't upgrade the old box. new boxes need better cooling. old cases can't do it. don't go for the cheapest $400 computer either. you will get the equivalent of a 2004-era machine and you would have wasted $400 for nothing (well, maybe gained a newer OS).spend about $600-$1000 on a laptop or desktop - I prefer desktops because they last longer (you just change parts).
  • if you have an old 2004-era (whatever) router, and it's slowing you down, get a new one. today the ASUS RT-AC66U is probably your best router 4/2013 and costs $200.
  • if you are using CAT3 ethernet cables, switch immediately to CAT5E or better yet, CAT6. both of those are gigabit. cat5 is 100Mbps.
  • If you are using ANY 10Mbps equipment, upgrade immediately to gigabit everything. you will want to prepare for upcoming speeds. comcast is supposed to be coming out with gigabit (fiber to the house?) at some point, but no telling when. lower-speed anything, (cables, switches, routers, NICs, modems) on the network will slow down the whole network to THAT minimal speed.
  • you can get up to your download/upload rate for data speed. with xfinity's
  • upgrading my router to high-end off-the-shelf made a multiple times difference in speed.
  • newer router technologies have more range!
  • don't go for 1Mbps DSL if you need streamed video.

Formerly, I had said that overall Internet speed was determined by MIN(upload rate, download rate) and that your download rate will be the speed of your upload rate - well, it WAS for me because at the time:

  • I had a 2004-era (8-9 year old) slow computer
  • I had a 2004-era (8-9 year old) slow, b/g router

This was an incorrect assumption on my part.

Now that I have a new machine, I have just performed a test of my download rate, and my rate is spec'd at 50Mbps/10Mbps by xfinity/comcast. with the "performance boost" they give (really I think a temporary raise on the speed cap), you get more than that at first. indeed, I was getting up to 62Mbps download rate periodically. average was 6.5MiBps*8*2^20=54,525,952bps so I have verified that the download rate does come through as a download rate as is, and is not limited by minimum of (upload rate, download rate), which is usually the upload rate being the minimum of the two.

SUMMARY: in other words, don't think about download rates/upload rates unless you have 5-8-year-old hardware and speed is critical to you. hmm. I guess today it IS important...